Tag Archives: Willimantic

Year in Review: September – October 2012

Sub Base Commander Marc Denno boards the train on a special ride from New London northwards to Willimantic on October 4 to demonstrate revived rail potential for the region; numerous civic and business leaders attended.Train Moves From Past To Future

Sub Base Commander Marc Denno boards the train on a special ride from New London northwards to Willimantic on October 4 to demonstrate revived rail potential for the region; numerous civic and business leaders attended.

 

 


At its Annual Meeting on September 20 at the Calabrese Club in Westerly, the Pawcatuck Neighborhood Center (PNC) honored Alexis Ann, founder, editor, and publisher of The Resident, with its 2012 Good Neighbor Award. (l-r) Seth Handyside, Communication Team Manager, the Resident; June Strunk, Board President, PNC; Tony Schillaci, Writer, the Resident; Alexis Ann, Founder, Editor & Publisher, Owner, the Resident; Don Church, Writer, the Resident; Vicki  Anderson, Executive Director, PNC; Anna Trusky, Writer, the Resident; and Carolyn Guzzo, Graphics and Production, the Resident.The Resident Good News Team Awarded “Good Neighbor Award” from Pawcatuck Neighborhood Center

At its Annual Meeting on September 20 at the Calabrese Club in Westerly, the Pawcatuck Neighborhood Center (PNC) honored Alexis Ann, founder, editor, and publisher of The Resident, with its 2012 Good Neighbor Award. (l-r) Seth Handyside, Communication Team Manager, the Resident; June Strunk, Board President, PNC; Tony Schillaci, Writer, the Resident; Alexis Ann, Founder, Editor & Publisher, Owner, the Resident; Don Church, Writer, the Resident; Vicki  Anderson, Executive Director, PNC; Anna Trusky, Writer, the Resident; and Carolyn Guzzo, Graphics and Production, the Resident.

 


The Honorable Paul Cravinho with his wife, Kathleen Cravinho. Three things dear to every Stonington resident: the “COMO,” the fishing fleet, and civic mainstays like retired Judge of Probate and town leader, Paul Cravinho. And all three were honored at the 5th Annual Gala “Stars Over Stonington” event “in honor of the people who uphold the traditions and honor of Stonington.” The Stars gathering was on September 21 at Stonington Meadows.COMO Honors Paul Cravinho and Fishing-Lobstering Heritage

The Honorable Paul Cravinho with his wife, Kathleen Cravinho. Three things dear to every Stonington resident: the “COMO,” the fishing fleet, and civic mainstays like retired Judge of Probate and town leader, Paul Cravinho. And all three were honored at the 5th Annual Gala “Stars Over Stonington” event “in honor of the people who uphold the traditions and honor of Stonington.” The Stars gathering was on September 21 at Stonington Meadows.

 


For Lynn Malerba, the 18th Chief of the Mohegan Tribe, enrollment in a new Yale University doctoral program is a direct continuation of her professional life in nursing, and her deep responsibilities to her tribal nation. She is one of fourteen candidates in the new program. Chief Malerba Embarks on DNP

For Lynn Malerba, the 18th Chief of the Mohegan Tribe, enrollment in a new Yale University doctoral program is a direct continuation of her professional life in nursing, and her deep responsibilities to her tribal nation. She is one of fourteen candidates in the new program.

 

 


At ceremonies in Busan, Korea, Jan Miller was named a district governor for Lions Club International.Jan Miller Named Lions District Governor

At ceremonies in Busan, Korea, Jan Miller was named a district governor for Lions Club International.

Natchaug’s 54th Annual Reception

story & photo
by Anne Pappalardo

On the evening of June 5th at the historic American Thread Mill #2 in Willimantic, the Board of Directors of Natchaug Hospital in Mansfield welcomed guests, friends, staff, and benefactors to their 54th Annual Reception.

Visitors sampled delectable hors d’oeuvres while enjoying the classical melodies performed by 11-year-old John C. Black from Barrington, RI, son of Janice Black, former CFO, Natchaug Hospital.

Distinguished guests included Raymond B. Johnson, M.D., Pfizer Global Research and Development, retired, and Chairman of the Natchaug Hospital Board of Directors; John J. Meehan, retired CEO of Hartford HealthCare and of Hartford Hospital; Stephen W. Larcen, Ph.D., President and CEO of Natchaug Hospital; and George A. Little, M.D., Director Emeritus, Natchaug Hospital.

Raymond Johnson introduced the Board of Directors. He said about George A. Little, “Over 54 years ago George helped lay the foundation of Natchaug Hospital. His first job there was in the kitchen – he sure has come a long way! George is a tremendous asset to Natchaug, where he is continuing the legacy of his parents.” Raymond then presented George with a Distinguished Service Award.

George is the son of Dr. Olga Little, a psychiatrist, and Dr. Mervyn Little, a general practitioner, who together in 1954 founded a convalescent facility for elderly, postoperative and terminally ill patients, who required psychiatric health services. Natchaug Hospital evolved over time to become the primary resource for local residents seeking mental health and substance abuse services. George, former chairman of the Department of Maternal and Child Health at Dartmouth Medical Center, is an internationally respected academic pediatrician.

Natchaug’s Capital Campaign 2007-08 encompassed expansion of the hospital’s Child and Adolescent Inpatient Treatment Unit and improvements to the adult inpatient unit. Natchaug Hospital provides a regional system of care for children, adolescents, and adults with mental illnesses, emotional traumas, substance abuse, and behavioral health problems. The hospital provides care to more than 2,000 children and adolescents each year in their special schools, after-school and inpatient programs. Lawrence and Memorial, Backus, Windham, Day Kimball, and Middlesex Hospitals, and CT Children’s Medical Center rely on Natchaug to provide inpatient care for young patients with psychiatric illnesses. Admissions to Natchaug Hospital’s child and adolescent unit increased by 40 percent since 2003.

John Meehan said, “Natchaug Hospital is the anchor of Eastern CT – very responsive to mental health needs. This is a community hospital – an institution of the community, in the community.” Natchaug formalized its affiliation with Hartford HealthCare Corporation (HHCC) in 1998. Stephen Larcen responded, “Throughout our 10-year relationship with Hartford HealthCare there have been nothing but benefits. We could not have done it without John.”

Kate Mattias, Executive Director, NAMI-CT, wrapped the evening up by delivering a presentation, Building Brighter Futures for Children, which outlined the support systems NAMI offers for people suffering from mental illness and their families. Kate explained, “NAMI’s mission is support, education, and advocacy. Today families want early identification of issues, effective intervention, a reduction in stigmas, and the removal of barriers that prevent families from accessing services.”

Very, Very Victorian

story & photo
by Anne Pappalardo

June 5th through 8th, visitors flocked to Willimantic’s 10th Annual Victorian Days. Presented by the Willimantic Victorian Neighborhood Association, events included home tours, horse-drawn wagon rides, a Titanic exhibit, a lantern tour of three bridges, a cemetery tour, and numerous other activities.

Visitors to Willimantic are impressed by the high concentration and classic design of the homes in the Hill section that rivals those in San Francisco. The Willimantic Victorian Neighborhood Association earned recognition for the area on the National Register of Historic Places and obtained non-profit status.

As visitors walked the streets, they were transported to a more genteel era. They encountered the clip-clop of horse-drawn carriage tours, and ladies mincing down side streets in gauzy dresses with large hats and delicate parasols. Dapper men sporting straw hats and canes directed visitors to their destinations.

The main feature of the weekend was the tour of 16 magnificent Victorian homes in the area. Homeowners and docents accompanied visitors through the homes while recounting the history of each house, its families, and renovations.

Other events included a Model T Ford exhibition, a Victorian tea, Victorian garden tours, a Victorian architecture slide show, a lawn concert, and a “Third Class Bash” – a party that encouraged attendees to “participate in the rowdiness of third class with food, music, and notable Titanic passengers.” Period dress was encouraged.

Robert Horrocks, president of the association, said, “With more than 600 homes designated by the National Register as contributing to the architectural styles of Willimantic, the community is quickly becoming a tourist destination. The addition of the Visitor’s Center at the Windham Textile and History Museum has made information for tourists readily available. Victorian Days in Willimantic was started by a few homeowners who wanted to share their insight into the restoration and preservation of their Victorian style homes.”

The association serves to educate the public in the preservation and promotion of the history, architecture, and character of Victorian Willimantic.

The members of the association share their love, and even passion, for their community and produce a monthly newsletter with a focus on neighbors and craftsmen who work on old homes. For more information on the annual event or the Willimantic Victorian Neighborhood Association, visit www.victorianwillimantic.org.