Tag Archives: Waterford

Year in Review: February – June 2012

Sue Murphy, Executive Director, Liberty Bank Foundation, opened the Business Breakfast at Three Rivers February 29, sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce of Eastern Connecticut, Dominion Millstone Power Station, and Liberty Bank Foundation.Generational Diversity  Harnessed For Productivity

Sue Murphy, Executive Director, Liberty Bank Foundation, opened the Business Breakfast at Three Rivers February 29, sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce of Eastern Connecticut, Dominion Millstone Power Station, and Liberty Bank Foundation.

 


Snip!  The new showroom of Grader Jewelers opened on March 30, on 217 Boston Post Road in Waterford. Peter, left, and Mark Grader wield the symbolic scissors at the ribboncutting along with Lorraine Grader, Don Stewart, and Linda Grader (center). Flanking them are State Senator Andrea Stillman, left, and the Chamber of Commerce of Eastern Connecticut’s President, Tony Sheridan, right, who honored the Grader family at the event.Grader Jewelers Sparkles With New Building In Waterford

Snip!  The new showroom of Grader Jewelers opened on March 30, on 217 Boston Post Road in Waterford. Peter, left, and Mark Grader wield the symbolic scissors at the ribboncutting along with Lorraine Grader, Don Stewart, and Linda Grader (center). Flanking them are State Senator Andrea Stillman, left, and the Chamber of Commerce of Eastern Connecticut’s President, Tony Sheridan, right, who honored the Grader family at the event.


(l-r) Herbert Lebowitz, West Hartford, Adolph Betterini, Avon, and Steve Cavallari, Kensington, take part in a meeting for the AmericanWarrior organization at the Rose City Senior Center. On May 26, the organization sent 100 World War II Veterans to see their national memorial for the first time. WWII Veterans: Day of Honor in Norwich Sees 100 Vets On DC Trip

(l-r) Herbert Lebowitz, West Hartford, Adolph Betterini, Avon, and Steve Cavallari, Kensington, take part in a meeting for the AmericanWarrior organization at the Rose City Senior Center. On May 26, the organization sent 100 World War II Veterans to see their national memorial for the first time.


Three generations of Whittles — Bob, Rick and Phil — are proud to carry on the family tradition of farming started by Robert Whittle in 1906.Willow Spring: A Whittle Tradition For Five Generations

Three generations of Whittles — Bob, Rick and Phil — are proud to carry on the family tradition of farming started by Robert Whittle in 1906.

 

 


On April 14, big scissors cut a big ribbon as young Ryan Hewes, assisted by Shari Holdridge Hewes and Mayor John Rodolico, symbolically re-open the Holdridge center in Ledyard. Left to right are Tony Sheridan (at microphone), Eric Kane, Mayor Rodolico, Ben Hewes, Ryan Hewes, Rep. Tom Reynolds, and Matt Hewes. Ryan is a sixth-generation Holdridge.Holdridge Helps Ledyard Stay Green

On April 14, big scissors cut a big ribbon as young Ryan Hewes, assisted by Shari Holdridge Hewes and Mayor John Rodolico, symbolically re-open the Holdridge center in Ledyard. Left to right are Tony Sheridan (at microphone), Eric Kane, Mayor Rodolico, Ben Hewes, Ryan Hewes, Rep. Tom Reynolds, and Matt Hewes. Ryan is a sixth-generation Holdridge.

 


(l-r) David B. Moorehead, Executive Director, Waterford Country School, and Scott Gladstone, owner of ten local Wireless Zone stores, holds the Community Service Award just presented to him at the School’s Recognition Night Dinner held at the Eugene O’ Neill Theater Center on May 23.Waterford Country School Recognizes Scott Gladstone

(l-r) David B. Moorehead, Executive Director, Waterford Country School, and Scott Gladstone, owner of ten local Wireless Zone stores, holds the Community Service Award just presented to him at the School’s Recognition Night Dinner held at the Eugene O’ Neill Theater Center on May 23.

 


L+M’s Friends and Family Celebrate a Century of Care

A sparkling gala for 2,000 friends and employees celebrated the hundredth anniversary of Lawrence + Memorial Hospital on May 19. A few of the celebrants were (l-r) Martha Garvin, Jackie Linicus, Cheryl Copp, Beth Landa, MaryBeth Jordan, Nancy Shepard, Kim Tassone and Katrina O’Camp-Sheehan.

A sparkling gala for 2,000 friends and employees celebrated the hundredth anniversary of Lawrence + Memorial Hospital on May 19. A few of the celebrants were (l-r) Martha Garvin, Jackie Linicus, Cheryl Copp, Beth Landa, MaryBeth Jordan, Nancy Shepard, Kim Tassone and Katrina O’Camp-Sheehan.

Smart Power

Bensko Earns Dean’s List at Berklee College of Music
Bradley Bensko of Gales Ferry is on the Dean’s List at Berklee College of Music, having done superior work for the summer semester of the 2012 academic year. The Berklee curriculum, focusing on practical career preparation for the music industry, was founded on the principle that the best way to prepare students for careers in music was through the study and practice of contemporary music.

Lydia Rose Krause  of  Colchester Enrolls at Clemson University
Lydia Rose Krause of Colchester recently enrolled at Clemson University. Krause is majoring in Biological Sciences. Krause is among nearly 3,400 freshmen at Clemson for the fall semester.

Ledyard Resident  Amanda  Hutchinson Inducted into Honor Society at Ithaca College
Amanda Hutchinson, of Ledyard, was inducted into Ithaca College’s Oracle Honor Society in November. First-year students who maintain a GPA that puts them in the top 10% of all students in their school throughout their first full academic year are invited into the society. Hutchinson is majoring in Journalism in the college’s Park School of Communications.

ECSU Students Design Posters for Windham Hospital Auxiliary Gala
Ten Eastern Connecticut State University students recently participated in a poster project as part of Visual Arts Professor June Bisantz’s Eastern Design Group course. The students designed posters for the Windham Hospital Auxiliary’s 17th Annual Autumn Gala, which was held recently at the Marriott Hotel in Hartford.

Sean Duggan ‘13 of Norwich (Visual Arts), Robert Gaines ‘13 of Uncasville (Visual Arts), and Kaitlin Morris ‘13 of Waterford (Visual Arts) were three of the students who designed posters for the event.

The posters reflected a Veterans Day and World War II-era theme for the event, “Sentimental Journey,” which raised funds for a local women’s health center. Each student created two posters. The students’ posters can be viewed here.

Local Residents Selected to Serve as RAs at Saint Michael’s College
Cameron Gonzalez, son of Ms. Beverly A. Gonzalez of Groton, a sophomore psychology major who graduated from Robert E. Fitch Senior High School before coming to Saint Michael’s, was selected for the 2012-2013 academic year as a Resident Assistant for the Office of Student Life at Saint Michael’s College, a liberal arts residential Catholic college located in Burlington, Vermont, one of the top 10 college towns in the country.

Resident assistants are selected from the entire Saint Michael’s undergraduate student population on the basis of faculty and staff recommendations. They display excellent leadership abilities, maturity and likelihood of being good role models for their peers. As a resident assistant, he or she lives in a campus residence hall and is readily available to help students.

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Speedbowl Champ Jeff Smith Coaches Third Graders

by John Stratton

The 2011 late-model-car Track Champion at Waterford Speedbowl returned to his roots on June 7, as he shared a closeup look at his car and his philosophies with 19 Third Graders at Lyme-Old Lyme’s Center School.The 2011 late-model-car Track Champion at Waterford Speedbowl returned to his roots on June 7, as he shared a closeup look at his car and his philosophies with 19 Third Graders at Lyme-Old Lyme’s Center School.

Jeff, now 21, is an Old Lyme native. He was also a student of their teacher, Leanne Williams, back in his Second Grade at Mile Creek School a dozen years ago. That was a couple of years after he began his racing career in quarter-midget cars. Close readers of The Resident may even recall a December 2004 feature that highlighted Smith’s trophy-winning early career.

His star appearance on the green fields behind the Lyme Street school was the culmination of a series of lessons in reading and understanding created by Williams, who asked the students to prepare a written list of questions for Smith based on their readings of stories and books, notably “Racing in the Rain: My Life as a Dog” which combines racing ideals with family challenges. In addition, the students viewed track videos of Jeff in action at Waterford Speedbowl, learning to analyze and describe the drivers’ challenges.

In fact, Jeff’s path to the 2011 championship in Waterford in his “American-Canadian Tour” Late Model racing car, the 2004 Monte Carlo-bodied number 15 emblazoned with sponsors’ names and logos, was not just about winning races, but more about 21 top-five finishes in the 22-race championship schedule.

“Winning a race feels pretty good,” Jeff said in response to a student question, “but it’s better to win a championship made of many races.”  Since he started racing at age 7, he figures that he’s been in 10,800 races and heat races—some short, some long, all learning experiences.

Known as “Big Country” because of his six-foot, five-inch frame and easy-going, quiet nature, he’s developed a reputation for class and sportsmanship on the track, a point emphasized by his crew chief and father, Wayne Smith. Wayne and his own father also raced at Waterford years ago. Jeff’s mother, Karen, serves as a communicator and general organizer for the group.

Eager hands go up, with questions, many questions about his car, his life, his team and his teamwork with other racers.

So, what’s it like to zip down the straightaways at over 100 mph, slow for the corners at 50, and avoid contact with many others doing the same thing, trying to win?

Jeff answers: “It’s about focus and concentration. I really know at all times where I am on the track, the corner I’m in, the number of laps I’ve gone, my position, and where I want to be next.”

Not a bad life-lesson for a Third Grader, watching attentively.

Waterford Teen Receives National MS Society Scholarship

by Megan Alexander

Olivia Burdick jumped out of bed one Christmas morning in restlessly expectation. Just nine years old, she could barely contain herself as she awaited the opening of gifts and what was sure to be a holiday feast fit for royalty. Instead, Olivia awoke to a day full of anxiety and fear. A day landing her family not around the radiant evergreen, but rather sitting for endless hours in an emergency room. Her mother, Melissa Burdick, woke up that morning unable to walk or even feel her legs. A few days later Melissa Burdick was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.

Olivia became her mother’s primary caretaker. She learned to help her mom with her weekly injections, and oversee many other chores around the house.

“Seeing my mother every day triumphing in her battle with MS is my greatest inspiration,” says Olivia.

Witnessing her mother’s challenges made Olivia work hard in her academics and extracurricular activities, and motivated her to pursue a career as a physician’s assistant.

“I would consider myself successful in life if I could do what my mother’s doctors have done for her: provide patients with surgeries and treatments that would save them or better their quality of life,” Olivia says.

A native of Waterford, Olivia is a member of the Medical Careers Club, Class Council and Key Club. She volunteers and shadows at a local hospital. She competed in French at an event in Quebec called International Comp Dictee des Ameriques. Olivia graduated this spring from Waterford High School, and she plans to attend the UConn Avery Point Campus in Groton, as a biology major.

“It is a pleasure to, along with the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, award this scholarship to such a bright and compassionate young woman,” says Lisa Gerrol, President and  Chief Professional Officer of the CT Chapter. “Ms. Burdick has demonstrated an exceptional ability to aptly express the challenges facing a family affected by MS, while remaining hopeful and positive.”

More then 6,000 CT residents, like Melissa Burdick, battle the potentially debilitating effects of multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system. There is no cure. Funds donated to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, CT Chapter, ensure ongoing scientific research to find better treatments and a cure. These funds also provide for vital programs and services for those in CT living with MS.

Upon receiving the letter announcing her award, Olivia’s excitement could be heard around the neighborhood. “When I opened it, I screamed!” Olivia recalls. “My mother has become my greatest role model by inspiring me with her unrelenting strength and optimism, stirring me to face challenges and encouraging me to excel in school and in other aspects of my life. Multiple sclerosis has defeated neither my mother nor myself, but has only made us stronger.”

The National MS Society Scholarship program is offered yearly to vocational, technical or college-bound, high school seniors diagnosed with multiple sclerosis or whose parent has MS. Applications can be downloaded by going to www.nationalmssociety.org. For more information, please contact the CT Chapter at 860.714.2300 or visit www.ctfightsms.org.