Tag Archives: Hospice of Southeastern Connecticut

Ryan and Gladstone Lead Wireless Zone Stores to Success

by John Stratton

(l-r) Josh Carroll, sales associate, Wallingford location, Scott Gladstone, owner, Wireless Zone,  Matthew Schloemann, sales associate, Guilford location, Neil Ryan, owner, Wireless Zone, and James Stack, sales associate, New London location.

(l-r) Josh Carroll, sales associate, Wallingford location, Scott Gladstone, owner, Wireless Zone, Matthew Schloemann, sales associate, Guilford location, Neil Ryan, owner, Wireless Zone, and James Stack, sales associate, New London location.

We’ve all been living in the middle of a technological revolution for the past few decades, and for most of us that’s been a very good thing—except for the confusing onrush of new capabilities and “apps” for that powerful little cellphone that we carry. In fact, the phone is so powerful that we often can’t decide what, exactly, are the best choices for our own lives.
But there are those who are there to help us sort it all out.

For the two founders of Wireless Zone stores in eastern and southern ConnecticutNeil Ryan and Scott Gladstone—it’s definitely not a “one size fits all” business. For the past 20 years, they’ve built a reputation for both keeping abreast of technology for business-to-business service, as well as, providing up-front, face-to-face service to everyday cellphone users.  In fact, that service is what made them a success.

“Yes, the technology moves fast,” says Neil, “but Wireless Zone is there to make that technology available to real people to improve their real lives…by getting to know what those lives are all about.”

Scott adds that, “From Day One, we were very fortunate that we had a ‘customer-centric’ philosophy, building on referrals, involving ourselves in the community, and separating ourselves from our competitors.”

It was a lot of work, though, and involved a commitment to an opportunity that they jumped at in 1992, when Scott called Neil and said that they could collaborate in a then-emerging business. The two had been friends since freshman orientation at Keene State College in Keene, New Hampshire. Both were business majors; after graduation, Scott became involved in the car phone business… and he saw prospects for exciting growth. Neil plunged right in, and they both moved to southeastern Connecticut, with few contacts here other than a strong faith in the lifestyles of the communities around them—and in the Wireless Zone concept, which was part of the burgeoning Verizon system. They opened their first Wireless Zone in Groton, and now have ten stores with skilled, people-oriented personnel.

In those earliest days, Wireless Zone stores were about “car phones,” those gee-whiz features in the cars of traveling industrial representatives and busy business people whose office was effectively within their vehicle. Today, cell phones are everywhere, on every belt and in every handbag.

It’s hard to live without them, since they’ve grown far beyond voice communication into powerful computers with links to the Internet and hundreds of thousands of functions available. “It’s a remote control to the world,” Neil observes. As that “remote” increases in flexibility, though, understanding it becomes crucial.

“My view,” said Scott, “is that we are not a ‘box-store’ experience, selling a device and then charging you to set it up. We spend a lot of time to be sure that our team members know how to transfer data, emails, and applications for customers, so that the customer is confident in the phone’s use and potential.  And we are there at no charge if they have questions or are looking for suggestions.”

Neil cites a contractor who came in recently, wanting a new phone. “We were able to show him how a new application can scan a room and help to provide working drawings, measure studs, locate key structures. We do it all: set up, load, train, transfer data, handle everything in the transition. What’s cool is that we can save them money, too!”

Celebrating 20 Years of Wireless Zone Communications: On the 20th Anniversary guest list were Amara Alpert and Kitty Stalsburg, High Hopes Therapeutic Riding; Nancy and Bob Gentes, Madonna Place; Denise & Jeffrey Hawk, Hospice of Southeastern Connecticut; Bill Stanley and Karen Buck, L+M Hospital; Shawn Maynard, Thomas Birkenholz, and Kathy Gaito, Windham Hospital; Denise and Bob Hornbecker, Channel 3 Kids Camp; Make-a-Wish Foundation; Kathy and Lou Allen, Thames River Community Services; Jerry Fischer and Marcia Reinhard, Jewish Federation of Eastern Connecticut; and Lucy and Gerry Fortier, Brattleboro Area Drop In.

Celebrating 20 Years of Wireless Zone Communications: On the 20th Anniversary guest list were Amara Alpert and Kitty Stalsburg, High Hopes Therapeutic Riding; Nancy and Bob Gentes, Madonna Place; Denise & Jeffrey Hawk, Hospice of Southeastern Connecticut; Bill Stanley and Karen Buck, L+M Hospital; Shawn Maynard, Thomas Birkenholz, and Kathy Gaito, Windham Hospital; Denise and Bob Hornbecker, Channel 3 Kids Camp; Make-a-Wish Foundation; Kathy and Lou Allen, Thames River Community Services; Jerry Fischer and Marcia Reinhard, Jewish Federation of Eastern Connecticut; and Lucy and Gerry Fortier, Brattleboro Area Drop In.

“With our customers,” Neil adds, “it’s an interview process, to give them a better mobile experience and help them grow into its possibilities. We do tons of education; it’s free; it’s enjoyable; it comes to us naturally.”

They are continuing to seek expansion beyond their present stores in Groton, New London, Killingly, Branford, Guilford, Wallingford, North Windham, Putnam, Tolland…and Brattleboro, Vermont.  But a key is the staff, Scott asserts. “We keep our ears to the ground to find good people who are available,” he says, “so we can train, educate, and instill them with our customer-oriented values.”

The future of mobile computing and cellphones is ever-changing, said Neil, but he sees rapid increases in “machine-to-machine” connections that will keep homeowners in closer control of their home devices of all kinds; likewise, he sees ever more expansion of cellphones as means to manage home and personal finances.

Wireless Zone is very involved in community support with at least 50 organizations, notably the Make-a-Wish Foundation, Hospice of Southeastern Connecticut, Lawrence + Memorial Hospital, Waterford Country School, Madonna Place, and Thames Valley Community Services. The nonprofit donations can range from $1,000 to $30,000.

Neil, originally from Port Jefferson, Long Island lives in Stonington with his 10-year old son, Jack; and Scott is a Waterford resident with his wife, Simone, and children Shayna, 8, and Travis, 11.

“We’re fortunate, Scott reflects, “that the community was so receptive, and we want to always exceed people’s expectations for us.”

Year in Review: June – September 2012

Finbar Gittelman, Admiral and First Sea Lord of the Conch Republic, right, greets Lynn Malerba, 18th Chief of the Mohegans, aboard the Admiral’s vessel, Wolf, at OpSailCT 2012, held July 6-9.All Aboard Topsail Schooner Wolf

Finbar Gittelman, Admiral and First Sea Lord of the Conch Republic, right, greets Lynn Malerba, 18th Chief of the Mohegans, aboard the Admiral’s vessel, Wolf, at OpSailCT 2012, held July 6-9.

 

 

 

 


Sequins ablaze, (l-r) Membership Services Administrator Kirsten Petrizzo poses with Angie Smith and Executive Director Lisa Konicki on June 26.Angela Smith is Greater Westerly Chamber’s 2012 Citizen of the Year

Sequins ablaze, (l-r) Membership Services Administrator Kirsten Petrizzo poses with Angie Smith and Executive Director Lisa Konicki on June 26.

 

 

 

 


(l-r) Ken Capano Sr., Red Sox Hall of Famer Fred Lynn, N.Y. Hall of Famer Goose Gosage, Scott Capano, Owner, Harp & Dragon, and Ken Capano Jr. rally for group photo after the benefit tournament on July 31.Long Woods, Crisp Irons, Smooth Putts Net $200K for Anne Capano Foundation

(l-r) Ken Capano Sr., Red Sox Hall of Famer Fred Lynn, N.Y. Hall of Famer Goose Gosage, Scott Capano, Owner, Harp & Dragon, and Ken Capano Jr. rally for group photo after the benefit tournament on July 31.

 


Stan Cardinal received an award from Hospice of Southeastern Connecticut in Norwich on September 4 for its generous donations. The award was bestowed to Stan by Denise Hawk, Annual Giving and Special Events Manager, and Jeffrey Nelson, Hospice Director of Community Development.Cardinal Honda Receives Award from Hospice of SECT

Stan Cardinal received an award from Hospice of Southeastern Connecticut in Norwich on September 4 for its generous donations. The award was bestowed to Stan by Denise Hawk, Annual Giving and Special Events Manager, and Jeffrey Nelson, Hospice Director of Community Development.

 

 


OpSail 2012 in Connecticut filled the New London harbor with 23 Tall Ships, Navy vessels, and Coast Guard cutters July 7 and 8 as part of a national celebration to note the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, a war that gave America its national anthem. Above, the Cisne Branco in breathtaking full sail with full crew.OpSail2012 Fills New London Harbor

OpSail 2012 in Connecticut filled the New London harbor with 23 Tall Ships, Navy vessels, and Coast Guard cutters July 7 and 8 as part of a national celebration to note the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, a war that gave America its national anthem. Above, the Cisne Branco in breathtaking full sail with full crew.

 

 

 

 

 


A sharp, baby-blue, Caddy Convertible Coupe that dazzled eyes in ’62 was a Wild Wednesdays’ attraction in August at the Sun, where some great examples of the car-modifiers’ and -restorers’ art met Wednesday evenings. Chauffeuring is Alexis Ann of The Resident; in the back seat are the two owners, Bill Turner, left, and Paul Coutu, behind the driver. Time to hit the road!Wild Wednesdays at Mohegan Sun

A sharp, baby-blue, Caddy Convertible Coupe that dazzled eyes in ’62 was a Wild Wednesdays’ attraction in August at the Sun, where some great examples of the car-modifiers’ and -restorers’ art met Wednesday evenings. Chauffeuring is Alexis Ann of The Resident; in the back seat are the two owners, Bill Turner, left, and Paul Coutu, behind the driver. Time to hit the road!

Hospice Southeastern CT Finds Home

story & photo
by Maren Schober

Dreams really do come true and today’s ribbon cutting ceremony at the new offices of Hospice Southeastern CT (HSECT) proves it. On May 22, HSECT officially opened its new administrative office and Community Bereavement Center at 227 Dunham Street, Norwich.

“Although we moved into our new headquarters in February, we waited until now for the official opening when the weather would be warm,” Patricia Morgan, Director of Commmunity Develoment, HSECT, jokes in her opening remarks. Much laughter follows as today is cold and rainy.

Nathan Beit, Chairman Building Committee, HSECT, sums up all the thoughts when he states, “Hospice is all about providing the best end of life care in our area.”

HSECT provides hospice, palliative care and bereavement services to over 6,000 patients and their families in New London County. Most patients are cared for in their own homes. Many times care is also provided in skilled nursing facilities.

The new Community Bereavement Center offers many services including bereavement and caregiver support groups, a special program for widows and widowers, expressive arts for chidren, teenagers and adults, and educational materials and videos on coping with grief and loss.

The 8,400 square foot new administrative office and bereavement center houses over 72 HSECT employees. Staff members train patient care volunteers to support the caregiver, offer respite, companionship, assistance with household chores, complementary therapies for the patient, and help in many other ways.
Bereavement volunteers offer support to grieving family members before the patient’s death and up to 13 months after death.

Betty Beaudette, Gloria Sinopoli and Zita Smith have been volunteers for HSECT for many years. “Working with patients for Hospice makes you feel good,”

Gloria shares. “There are so many ways you can help a patient, “ Betty agrees.

“When my parents were very ill and at home, there was no hospice at that time,” Zita tells me. “ I had a health aide come in and then I went out to get things done or just relax. Because of that experience, I now volunteer for hospice and give respite care so the caregiver can have a break.”

Another Hospice volunteer, Glenn Arthur, remarks, “When my mother was very ill, hospice came and helped with her care at home. Now I am a respite volunteer for caregivers in the hospice program.”

Volunteers can be trained to help in so many ways. For more information call 860.848.5699.