Author Archives: The Resident

Women in Biz!

Dr. Amy Canatta

Dr. Amy Canatta

Yona Gregory

Yona Gregory

Vicki Anderson

Vicki Anderson

Teresa Rose

Teresa Rose

Dr Susan Falk

Dr Susan Falk

Sandra Ladyga

Sandra Ladyga

Rose Sinagra

Rose Sinagra

Phyllis Moore

Phyllis Moore

Pam Luketich

Pam Luketich

Nataly Kelly

Nataly Kelly

Nancy Bulkeley

Nancy Bulkeley

Michele Strobel

Michele Strobel

Marsha Friedman

Marsha Friedman

Marilyn Lusher

Marilyn Lusher

Kyle Richards

Kyle Richards

Katherine Hackett

Katherine Hackett

Hellen Chen

Hellen Chen

Gail Grillo

Gail Grillo

Dr. Olympia Dreszler

Dr. Olympia Dreszler

Donna Yother

Donna Yother

Denise Dudek

Denise Dudek

Deb Jaccarino

Deb Jaccarino

Deb Fox

Deb Fox

Carol Maher

Carol Maher

Beverly Slattery

Beverly Slattery

Beth Glynn

Beth Glynn

Anna Lathrop

Anna Lathrop

Brenda Engel

Brenda Engel

Women in Biz…Are Busier than Ever!

Celebrating 31 years of small biz!

Celebrating 31 years of small biz!

Back in 1982, when I incorporated my small business as an advertising agency, I never thought that my next creation would develop into The Resident Good News. When the economy changed in 1990, my marketing instincts told me that what our two-state region needed was a publication that focused on good news about people doing good things in our communities.
As a U.S. Army-trained journalist, I knew how to write stories and capture events on camera and that my clients from Alexis Advertising, Incorporated, would give me a leg up with their support on my new venture.
Now, with 31 years in the trenches as an entrepreneur, I reflect back on the ups and the downs and ponder reasons for success. I’ve concluded that the single most important mission is helping others to shine! Today, there are many women in the workplace who started out much the same as I did, and you can see them on these very pages. Ingenuity and imagination–and a lot of hard work–have fostered these entrepreneurial achievements. They coexist with community and civic honors.
Enjoy our stories about the achievements of women and some secrets to their success. The Bethsaida Community in Norwich justly named Rose Sinagra as the recipient of its Carol Croteau Humanitarian Award, and designated Nancy Bulkeley to receive their Community Impact Award. You’ll see their faces shining from pages 4 and 5, where four young YMCA women “Reach Out to Youth.” Nataly Kelly reaches across language barriers on page 7; Phyllis Moore recalls a rough night a half-century ago on page 8; matchmaker Hellen Chen has good words for marriage on page 15; Deb Peterson, the goldminer’s daughter, is worth her weight in gold on page 16.
Thanks for reading The Resident, the Good News that Rocks! Remember, The Resident reaches 64 communities and is the most cost-effective way to advertise in the region. Please remember to patronize our advertisers.

Thanks for reading The Resident, the Good News that Rocks! Remember, the Resident reaches 64 communities and is the most cost-effective way to advertise in the region. Please remember to patronize our advertisers.

Alexis Anneditor & publisher

Alexis Ann
editor & publisher

TVCCA Carnevale Evening Supports Senior Nutrition

TVCCA’s Senior Nutrition Program, based in Bozrah,  is part of a nationwide effort to meet the nutritional and emotional needs of seniors age 60 and over. Regionally the program receives major support through an annual gala, “Carnevale,” which is coming up April 6; the gala, music-filled evening benefits the Meals-on-Wheels program that feeds thousands of Seniors every day.This year, the third annual Carnevale will be at the Port ’N’ Starboard at Ocean Beach in New London.

There, the assembly of volunteer Carnevale Chefs will be on hand to greet visitors: Joseph Tate is the Executive Chef at Ocean Beach Park in New London, where he has been for 12 years, and has extensive experience in many facets of the culinary arts. Sean Coleman is the General Manager for Grossman’s Seafood and for Beachside Catering LLC, where he has been since 1989 and where he has expanded on his culinary experience throughout his 23 years of service.

Bill Hendriks is the Executive Chef and Director of marketing and sales of Beachside Catering LLC since March of 2012, and has a total of 38 years of expertise in hands-on food/pastry production. Anna Lathrop is the owner of Gourmet Galley Catering, and with her staff has 30 years of custom event experience. Eric Petrus is the Head Chef at Gourmet Galley Catering, and has previous experience as Executive Chef as well as Sous Chef. Chef Sam Johnson is the Banquet Chef for Port ’N’ Starboard, where he originally started. Jack Chaplin is a graduate of Johnson and Wales culinary school and the owner of Chaplin’s in New London since 2009.

“We are all connected to seniors,” says director Timothy Grills. “They are members of our families, our neighbors, and part of our community. We are working every day helping seniors in need by delivering nutritious meals and providing compassion in communities across eastern Connecticut.”

Meals on Wheels, a familiar name, is a big effort that often operates behind-the-scenes.

Tim explains that “the program currently operates out of 33 Senior or Community Centers within 39 towns in New London County, Windham County, and part of Tolland County. Throughout the 33 locations, we have 50 daily Meals-on-Wheels routes covering 1200 square miles. “In the 2011-2012 fiscal year, our program served 1,574 homebound seniors a total of 307,724 meals-on-wheels.”

To make it work, Senior Nutrition also has a large and varied volunteer force, he points out.

“This past fiscal year, some 400 dedicated community volunteers donated 38,386 hours of their time to serve seniors in their communities,” Tim recounts. Celebrate Carnevale on April 6 and support the Meals-on-Wheels program…and enjoy some good eating, too. For tickets and more information on the program, call 860.886.1720 or go to Carnevale registration at http://www.tvcca.org/news/pdfs/carnevale_sponsor_form_2013.pdf

Anna Lathrop

Anna Lathrop

Bill Hendriks

Bill Hendriks

Eric Petrus

Eric Petrus

Jack Chaplin

Jack Chaplin

Joe Tate

Joe Tate

Sam Johnson

Sam Johnson

Sean Coleman

Sean Coleman

Timothy Grills

Timothy Grills

mealsonwheels

Clara, Gloria, and Harriett: Rescued Chickens Beat the Odds

Happy chickens and happy kids go together at the Rose farm in Charlestown, RI.

Happy chickens and happy kids go together at the Rose farm in Charlestown, RI.

by Angela O’Neill-Smith

There are very few people that would argue the fact: chickens are the most exploited animal on the planet. Every year billions of chickens live extremely constrained lives, in squalor conditions merely to face slaughter after only a few months of life.

Because the term “free range” is so vague and does not necessarily guarantee the humane treatment of chickens, animal advocates are delighted to witness the increasing popularity of many locals farming their own chickens.

It was during the 1920s with the development of vitamin supplements some farmers no longer believed it necessary for their animals to be outdoors — the supplements compensated for the nutritive value of sunlight. Approximately 20 years after the initial development of supplements, what served to further modify the way animals were raised was the development of antibiotics in the 1940s.  Since the 1940s farms have been expanding to include as many animals as possible, in as little space as possible.

The controversial factory farms of today’s society are often criticized because of their treatment of animals. The good news is we can often find local farm owners selling fresh, free-range eggs in our communities’ farm markets.

By shopping at local farmers’ markets we not only support small businesses, which is great in of itself, we often times get to know the merchants who produce the products we purchase. Many times the stories we hear from local farmers, the tales they tell, are heartwarming and often serve to remind us the value in cherishing compassion in philanthropic acts, such as humane farming.

I eat about a dozen eggs a week and I take great pride in knowing Phil and Teresa Rose of Charlestown, Rhode Island. They live with their son Jackson and their black Labrador Retriever Roxy in a charming log cabin, and coincidentally they raise chickens.

When Phil and Teresa moved into their home there stood an old coop that needed repair. Phil and Teresa wanted to raise a few chickens to supplement their family’s egg consumption. So Phil began building a new coop during the spring of 2009, his coop was modeled after the original coop and upon completion they purchased 6 Ameraucana Chicks. Ameraucana Chickens lay ornate, green-shelled eggs.

As the chickens were maturing and settling into their new home Teresa was contacted by a neighbor who knew of three chickens that were living in less than ideal conditions. The chickens were living on a farm with a dog that was tormenting them and desperately needed a new home. So as Teresa proudly shares the story of her chickens she introduces Clara, Gloria, and Henrietta, their three rescue chickens, “we integrated them right away with our adolescent chickens and they got along like old friends.”

It is remarkable that Phil and Teresa’s chickens get along so well. We all are familiar with the adage, “pecking order”. The saying originates from chickens as it is not unusual for chickens to fight and harm each other when new chickens are introduced to the coop. They will fight until a new pecking order is determined.

Teresa did not expect that Clara would survive the first winter after they adopted her, “Clara was pretty beat up when she arrived. She had no feathers on her head or rear and was very skinny; she was the slow one so she got the most abuse from the dogs.” By spring Clara was healthy and ready to explore, she started escaping from the enclosure and would wander around the yard.

Phil and Teresa had her wings clipped hoping that would discourage her from escaping. She continued to find her way out of the enclosure and roam around the yard. It did not take long for Clara to become the favorite. She liked being a part of the family and loved to follow everyone around the yard; she would often compete with Roxy their dog for attention and insist on being petted.

Eggs22Today Phil and Teresa have 27 chickens. Clara, she never laid suitable eggs, and Gloria and Harriett have passed their prime egg-laying days. “We talked about getting rid of Gloria and Harriett when they stopped laying, but then quickly changed our minds. We couldn’t give them up, they are our pets and we love them”, said Teresa. Sadly one of the rescue chickens, Harriett, passed away last year and was buried in the back yard. Teresa explains how “Gloria gets upset when new birds are introduced to the enclosure and gives them a hard time at first, she is the old lady of the coop and keeps the young girls in line, but overall they get along rather well. Clara still roams the yard. In fact we have about eight or nine girls roaming the yard every day. We don’t bother with clipping them anymore, since they find a way out.”

So many happy, healthy chickens inevitably leads to lots of delicious fresh eggs, about 18-19. After the winter molt it is expected that 27 chickens will be laying eggs. So Phil and Teresa are expecting about 24 eggs a day. “We can’t possibly eat all those eggs so we give them to friends and family. We are thinking about getting more chicks this spring, but that would mean building a bigger coop. So we’re still undecided”, they say.

When visiting Phil and Teresa you quickly recognize that each chicken has its own unique personality. And on their small farm in Charlestown, Rhode Island chickens are valued as living creatures who contribute to the family’s wellbeing; both nutritionally and in the pride of humane farming.

Women Find Plenty of Gold in Montana Mines

MineRescue1002

The Drumlummon Gold Mine, Marysville, Montana in the early 1900’s.

The treasure is still there, lots of it–but you have to dig deep to get it. Men and women alike. And they have been digging for 137 years, out in Montana. By the men, mostly, but for the past few years quite a few women, too.

My great-grandfather, Richard O’Connell, brought his family to America from Ireland in 1878, and settled in Marysville, Montana, to work at the famous Drumlummon Mine, discovered by fellow Irishman Thomas “Tommy” Cruse in 1876. The project is located in the Marysville mining district, approximately 20 road miles northwest of the city of Helena.

Initially, using the mining methods of the time, the gold-finding was a great success. After producing nearly $350,000 in gold, Cruse sold the mine to the Montana Mining Company, owned by the Rothschild family of London, in 1882 for $1,600,000. After losing an 11-year, bitter lawsuit concerning underground property-line infringement to the nearby Nine Hour Mine, in 1901 the Rothschilds flooded the lower levels of the mine and the St. Louis Mining Company took over operations.

Richard O’Connell worked at the Drumlummon/Nine Hour mine until 1914 and my grandfather, Rob O’Connell, was first an underground miner, then, delivered freight to the Drumlummon until he was elected County Commissioner in 1935. After World War II, my dad, Bob O’Connell, worked at the mine, which was by this time owned by the Montana Rainbow Mining Company. He hauled the last load of ore out in 1958. Was this the mine’s end? Not yet!

Drumlummon remained mostly closed and deteriorating for 50 years, until RX Exploration re-opened it in 2008. With new geological and analytical methods at their command, the new owners believed—correctly—that huge reserves of gold and silver still existed in the deepest levels of the mine, and that the Rothschild’s flooded it simply to prevent the St. Louis Mining Company from recovering them.

MineRescuedeb

Deb O’Connell Peterson, first woman ever certified for under-ground work at the Drumlummon mine

I was hired in April of 2008, first as head core-cutter; then I was promoted to the Fire Assay lab. I am thus the fourth generation of my family to work at the Drumlummon, and my extensive research seems to verify that I am the first woman ever certified for underground work at the Drumlummon mine. But I am not the first woman miner!

Mining has always been considered a masculine occupation, and one that has traditionally prevented women from entering it. The British Parliament made it illegal for a woman to work underground in 1842, and pre-Colonial Andes mines considered it bad luck for a woman to work in the mines.

In the gold-strike era of American history, the jobs for women in the gold fields were restricted to cooking, washing, or most often, working as girls of the night…or, delicately, “soiled doves.” There were more women gamblers than women prospectors.

Until the 1940’s, women were excluded from working underground. But the Second World War presented a labor shortage, one that forced companies and unions to hire women to fill mining positions. When the men returned at the end of the war, once again underground mining jobs for women became non-existent.

Montana’s war-manpower director explained that the state needed “men for the hard, heavy and unpleasant jobs” in mines and mills “where women cannot be used.” Anaconda Copper Mining Company and Mine Mill union officials agreed that mines, mills, and smelters could not employ women because they did not have the strength that the work required.

In the 1950’s and 1960’s the few underground women miners were called “Iron Girls.” Finally, with the passage of Equal Employment Opportunity Legislation in the 1970’s, women won the legal right to enter mining workplaces. Unfortunately, this was just as the industry began to move operations out of the country and lay off workers, but the times are changing, again.

Today, no one knows for sure how many underground women miners there are in the United States and Canada. Estimates range from 1.9 to 3 percent of all miners. In 2012, RX Gold merged with US Silver to become US Silver and Gold Corporation. Our present corporation has consistently offered women the same opportunities and benefits as men. Besides me, we have women geologists, haul-truck drivers, and equipment operators, as well as support staff.

MineRescue1001

The Drumlummon Gold Mine, Marysville, Montana in the early 1900’s.

There are very few restrictions for women with motivation, good work ethics, and positive attitude from obtaining any position. I am the only woman on the Drumlummon Mine Rescue team, a position that would have been unheard of for a female 20 years ago. The men on the team treat me as a respected, valuable member.

Bottom line: The Drumlummon Mine produced over 20,000 ounces of gold and 315,000 ounces of silver in 2012—so, it seems the old timers that swore that there was more gold still in the mountain, than ever came out, were dead right. I believe that my women co-workers Anh Sam, Amber, Sarah, Anna, Kendall, Mary, Karen, Janeen, Lisa and I will continue to receive great wages, health insurance, 401K benefits and paid leave in a welcoming work environment for many years to come. Gold has its benefits!

Bounce Back from Midlife Slump with Enlightened Cougarhood

Sunny Moon charts a happy course for women in their mid-life.

Sunny Moon charts a happy course for women in their mid-life.

It’s not hard for women in midlife to feel like they belong to the sad “Island of Broken Toys,” says Xandra “Sunny” Moon, a self-described “liberated, 18-wheeler-driving, 40-plus babe.”

“There are thousands of beautiful mothers, wives and ex-wives out there who feel like they’ve lost their sexuality–I know because they tell me as I travel the country and get to know them,” says Moon, author of “The Power of the Titz…a woman’s journey back to her self” (www.sunnymoonspowerworld.com). “My mission is to let them know they can get it back!”

Like the many of the women she meets in her travels, Moon suffered physical and emotional abuse as a young woman. After raising four children, she fell into a deep depression, she says. But by the time she climbed out, she was happy, confident and back in touch with the Real Sunny, she says. Moon lists the ways in which women 40 and older can rediscover the vivacious babe that still lurks within.

Embrace your sexuality! It’s not just a “Mrs. Robinson” stereotype–older women do make for better, more participatory partners. Older women have more self-possession; they tend to have more personality, intrigue, and performance.

Study and work? Perhaps the most important vehicle for Moon’s self-empowerment is her continuing education. Gaining her GED and furthering her education at a university allowed her to support herself with a good job.

Remember your old social life? A big part of relocating your inner diva is remembering the good times you had as a teen and 20-something–back when you had your first appletini, your first date at a fancy restaurant, and, yes, even your first day-long hangover. In many ways, these things recur like new again. Under-appreciated mothers and wives tend to live primarily for others, but now it’s time to reclaim those fun nights and also catch some time for yourself.

Cosmetic surgery? A touchy subject for many ladies. Moon’s has advice. Her first rule is to have cosmetic surgery only for yourself–not for someone else, and ensure you are in good enough health to withstand the rigors. Other important considerations include realistic expectations, potentially catty responses from girlfriends, short- and long-term consequences (such as time off work), and maintenance.

Dating outside your comfort zone? Maybe now is the time to consider other types of partners. Now is the time to be adventurous and explore new avenues.

Health/Diet/Exercise? Of course, feeling and looking attractive is important, so be healthy! Nothing is better at giving ladies that can-do attitude than a nice workout.

“We have but one life,” says Lee Abzu, Moon’s second husband, soulmate, and the coauthor of her books. “If you’re single and in your 40s, 50s, 60s, or older, you can either live your own new life, or wait around for the kids or grandkids to come by and visit!”

Xandra “Sunny” Moon came into her own after age 40. She has worked 14 years as a truck driver, during which she has spoken with thousands of women at midlife. She now counsels women who are seeking rebirth.

 

Boxer Shelito Vincent’s a Champion in the Making — Never Losing Faith

Shelito Vincent is the number-one-ranked Bantamweight in the U.S.

Shelito Vincent is the number-one-ranked Bantamweight in the U.S.

Vincent’s Never Too Late to Win

by Roger Zotti

New London’s Shelito Vincent says she boxes “for the therapeutic satisfaction that I’ve beaten life. I should have been dead six times over. I’ve been through so much hardship in my youth that I could write a book that would make the pages and the ink cry.”

Though her childhood and early adulthood were harrowing, “I still pulled through and chased my dream….It’s never too late—so never lose faith.”

A second reason is “for the kids—to show them there is hope, to show them their dreams can happen as long as you work your hardest and don’t give up. Dedication is key.” Still another is “for love, for my mother, for my city, for my family—but most importantly for me. I was born to do this.”

Shelito, a professional prizefighter, is 33 years old, “which I hate to admit,” she says with a smile. She fights at 118-123 pounds and has a perfect 7-0 record. She’s the number one ranked bantamweight in the United States, eighth in the world, and 11th in the Women’s International Boxing Association. “I was also a 2011 National Golden Gloves Champion as an amateur,” she adds.

Her biggest challenge as a professional has been “the transition from amateur to pro, and also getting sponsors. So here I’d like to thank Goldy’s in New London, BMW of Warwick, RI, the great Adian Vega for keeping my head so laced up come showtime, and Avant Gard Spa of Cumberland, Rhode Island.”

Evaluating her progress at this juncture in her career, Shelito says, “I’m signed with Jimmy Burchfield at Classic Entertainment & Sports, and my progress is phenomenal. I don’t think there’s a busier female fighter out there. Most females don’t move, but I’ve fought seven times since October 7, 2012. That’s unheard of. They take good care of me at CES.”

The Resident asked Shelito what she did during the day of a fight, during those cruel hours before round one. “I used to get stressed and nervous to the max,” she replies. “Now it’s just another day. I laugh with the crew. Then I warm up [until] it’s ready for war. I realize when I get in there, when I’m in the ring, we’re just dancing. Hands can’t hurt me.”

 

Fiercely proud of her Italian and Cape Verdean heritage, her success enables her to give back to the community. For example, she volunteers for the Special Olympics and visits “schools to talk to kids about building character and against bullying.” She helps out with children’s reading programs, has raised money for different cancer fundraisers (her mother passed away at age 37 from leukemia), and addressed New London’s Hope Week Conference on Effective Leadership.

In addition to being trained by Peter Manfredo, Sr., Shelito’s team consists of Mary Del Pino Morgan, Steve Maze, Marcia Agripino, Noemi Bosques, and Ricky Pierce. “It’s the best team out there. I’ve never been in such great shape in my life.” And as for who’s Shelito’s next opponent, she says “We’re lookin’ into a few right now.”

 

Are You a Woman Launching a Business or Book? Here’s Advice!

Marsha Friedman

Marsha Friedman

Your Competitive Advantage May Surprise You!

by Marsha Friedman

What’s your best advice for women in business? It’s a question I hear frequently as more and more women strike out on their own, whether it’s to start their own company, write a book, turn their great idea into a product, or otherwise monetize their talents. The number of women-owned businesses in this country is growing 1.5 times faster than the national average. From 1997 to 2011, they increased by 50 percent.

I love seeing this surge of confidence! Putting yourself out there is risky, but it’s better to try and fail then to spend a lifetime wondering, “What if?”

Yes, I do have a favorite piece of advice for women in business but first, a word about self-employed women.

Did you know that our businesses added 500,000 jobs over 10 years while other privately held firms lost jobs?

That in 2007, we accounted for $1.2 trillion in sales receipts?

Unfortunately, we’re also less likely than men to borrow money to expand, so our businesses are smaller. They’re also more likely to fail and, despite that huge number of sales receipts, we ring up disproportionately less than our male counterparts.

That information, by the way, comes from an interesting report produced by the U.S. Department of Commerce — “Women-Owned Businesses in the 21st Century.”

It details the progress we’ve made and some of the hurdles we still must overcome. The latter include the legacy of a long history of discrimination; our tendency to be risk-adverse; and even some of the ventures that we choose. The report says we can help ourselves by creating more supportive networks, having access to more information, and finding mentors.

That last point gave me pause. When I launched my first business, there were comparatively few female CEOs, and certainly no internet to foster communication among them. I learned how to run a business mostly through good old trial and error. That’s also how I figured out how to balance that work with my roles as mother, wife and daughter, and how to fit in time volunteering for the community organizations I valued.

But women don’t have to go it alone anymore, and nor should we. Which is why I welcome questions like, “What’s your best advice for women in business?” I’d like to see the new generations of self-employed females blow through the hurdles that still remain before us and create even more opportunities for the generations to come.

So what’s my best advice? That’s impossible to say, but here’s one for starters.

Know your audience.

And guess what? It’s you!

Women account for 73 percent to 85 percent of all consumer decisions (according to Boston Consulting Group, Competitive Edge Magazine, and TrendSight Group founder Marti Barletta. From the grocery store to the automobile dealership to the tech industry, women drive purchasing.

You need to communicate with that audience in mind. No, you don’t want to exclude men, but you also need to be sure your message appeals to women.

When I’m writing anything, whether it’s an email or a media pitch, I make a point to read over what I’ve written from the perspective of my audience. If I’m writing for industry peers, technical language is probably fine. If my audience is the media, concise and direct is best. If it’s clients, I want to be sure whatever I write also reflects my appreciation of them.

And then there’s the feminine factor.

As a woman, I’m a sucker for honesty and sincerity. I’m turned off by condescension. Unless the writer is somebody I already know and respect, I have little tolerance for preaching, judgment, or demands.

Any message that takes those things into account will work for men, too.

Whether you’re writing marketing copy, posting on social media, or working on an article or newsletter, if your goal is to turn your readers into buyers, you need to write with your audience in mind.

That’s not so hard – if you’re a woman.

Marsha Friedman is a 22-year veteran of the public relations industry. She is the CEO of EMSI Public Relations (www.emsincorporated.com), a national firm that provides PR strategy and publicity services to corporations, entertainers, authors and professional firms. Marsha is the author of Celebritize Yourself: The 3-Step Method to Increase Your Visibility and Explode Your Business and she can also be heard weekly on her Blog Talk Radio Show, EMSI’s PR Insider every Thursday at 3:00 PM EST.

Found In Translation: The Cost of Understanding, the Value of Words

Nataly Kelly, reading from her new book, Found In Translation

Nataly Kelly, reading from her new book, Found In Translation

by Jon Persson

When a 911 operator receives an urgent call from a Spanish-speaking citizen, a national service of interpreters is immediately called upon. Within 30 seconds, the caller is able to describe her dire situation; an intruder with a gun, outside her bedroom door—an immediate threat to the caller’s life. The operator responds that the nearest police officer is a block away, and then, the phone goes silent. The operator thanks the translator, who never knows the final outcome of the call.

This story, read aloud by author Nataly Kelly at New London’s  Monte Cristo bookstore, opens her newly published book, Found In Translation. She goes on to detail the importance of accurate and timely translation and interpretation of various languages in a global community.

“Translation,” she clarifies, “is written; interpretation is spoken.” Often, she continues, people who translate written language have difficulty interpreting spoken language, and vice versa. Thus, most language professionals specialize in one field only. And, while it is a common perception that translation of languages occurs mostly in popular literature or entertainment, this is not so, says Nataly.

Translation is a “33 billion dollar industry, mostly working in technical and manufacturing areas,” says Nataly. She goes on to list “religion, politics, businesses, manufacturing, courts, hospitals, mental institutions, schools, police, sciences, NASA, and automotive industries” as places where translators are needed.

“Does anyone own a foreign-made car?” she asks the audience as an example. “The owners’ manual had to be translated from the language of origin,” she points out. The example extends to everything imported, with the quality of translation of great importance to us all.

But the importance of accurate interpretation is most profound in medical and legal interactions. Nataly tells the tragic tale of “the 71 million dollar word,” where a young man in Florida was left a quadriplegic when one word was mis-interpreted by an attending nurse. A member of the audience offers the story of Connecticut’s last lobotomy patient, a Czechoslovakian man brought to Norwich State Hospital when his unfamiliar speech was mis-diagnosed as mental illness. These are the rare yet costly cases which highlight the need for clear and expedient interpretation.

Indeed, this imperative has long been codified in Title VI of the Civil Rights Act, which mandates the right to an interpreter. This includes all public agencies, from police to hospitals to social workers, and the Department of Justice is tasked with seeing this right is upheld.

Nataly is herself a Spanish translator who “lived in Ecuador for several years.” While there she participated in a project involving “relay interpretation,” where a poet who writes in an indigenous language would translate her work into Spanish, from which Nataly would translate into English.

Coast Guard Cutter Eagle Departs for Spring Training deployment

Coastguard Cutter "Eagle"

Coastguard Cutter “Eagle”

PORTSMOUTH, Va. – The crew aboard the U. S. Coast Guard Cutter Eagle is scheduled to depart Friday, with Coast Guard officer candidates for a 17-day training deployment.  Due to current budget reductions,  crewmembers aboard the Eagle will not make a previously scheduled port call to Savannah, Ga., March 15 – 18.  The Eagle crew will now stop for logistics only in Charleston, S.C., where the ship will moor and take on supplies and Coast Guard trainees at a government pier.

Before departing Charleston, Eagle will take on enlisted students from the Coast Guard boatswain’s mate A-school for the first time. Training together offers mutual benefits to both the officer candidates and enlisted students.  The officer candidates will build experience and learn how the ship functions during their first week aboard, and then will utilize that experience to help guide the A-school students assigned to their divisions during the second week of the deployment. Simultaneously, the officer candidates and the enlisted trainees will receive instruction in navigation, deck seamanship, line handling, damage control, medical techniques, and other basic elements of life aboard Coast Guard cutters.

“The Coast Guard Academy and the Leadership Development Center are academic institutions with collective missions to ensure the best and complete learning experience for our trainees, and the Eagle is a significant part of that experience,” said Capt. Wes Pulver, Eagle’s commanding officer. “We understand budget reductions are required and we remain committed to our highest priorities in providing academic and training excellence to the future leaders of our service.”

The Coast Guard decides upon locations for Eagle training deployments based on ideal weather and sea conditions at different times of the year for students to perform training under challenging circumstances. Trainees are required to handle more than 200 lines and practice marlinspike seamanship to bolster a teamwork ethic as part of their professional development in leadership.

The boatswains mate A-school in Yorktown, Va., is the central educational facility where students learn to perform almost any task in connection with deck maintenance, small boat operations, and navigation. Graduates become third class petty officers in the boatswain’s mate rating.

At 295 feet in length, the Eagle is the largest tall ship flying the stars and stripes and the only active square-rigger in U.S. government service.

Constructed in 1936 by the Blohm and Voss Shipyard in Hamburg, Germany, and originally commissioned as the Horst Wessel by the German Navy, the United States acquired Eagle as a war reparation following World War II.

To follow the Eagle’s cruise, visit the ship’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CoastGuardCutterEagle.

Coast Guard Atlantic Area Public Affairs

Contact: Lt. Cmdr. Jamie C. Frederick

Office: (757) 398-6608

Mobile: (757) 374-7991

Kelly Middle School Science Classrooms Restored after Fire

Pfizer and it’s local employees help restore the science classrooms at Kelly Middle School, Norwich.

Pfizer and it’s local employees help restore the science classrooms at Kelly Middle School, Norwich.

The long-standing relationship between Pfizer Inc. in Groton and and Kelly Middle School in Norwich has enabled Pfizer to donate the $5,000 insurance deductible, 40 computers, and seven printers to help the school recover its science-teaching capability after a March 4 fire in the school. The fire heavily damaged some key science classrooms.
The classrooms had been initially equipped through the work of Norwich Schools Superintendent Pam Aubin, who had approached Pfizer officials about a partnership called Qualified Zone Academy Bonds (QZAB). This program qualified businesses to help cities and towns like Norwich by funding educational projects at zero percent interest.
Pfizer employee and Kelly Middle School Building Committee Chairman Charlie Jaskiewicz and other Pfizer colleagues at the Groton laboratory complex helped complete the application process. As a result, the City of Norwich received $2,942,000 towards the zero-percent bond. City of Norwich Comptroller Joe Ruffo reported that, when the QZAB was awarded, it was saving City of Norwich taxpayers over a million dollars over the life of the bond.
Subsequently, the Kelly Middle School Building Committee and City of Norwich Board of Education voted to name all of the science classrooms after Charles Pfizer, who founded the now-global pharmaceutical company in 1849 in Brooklyn, New York.
After spending much of the day of the fire at the school, Charlie went back to work on Tuesday, informed the Pfizer educational-outreach committee of the losses, and asked if assistance could be given. After review, Pfizer was able to help the school both monetarily and with replacement computer equipment.
“The Kelly Middle School Building committee is proud of the special relationship that has been built with Pfizer, and is extremely thankful for their compassion and generosity as a result of the fire,” said Charlie.

Dominion’s Bulkeley to Receive Bethsaida Impact Award

by Susan Cornell

Nancy Bulkeley

Nancy Bulkeley

Nancy Bulkeley, Community Affairs Representative for Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, will receive the Bethsaida Community Impact Award at the Community‘s Fifth Annual Gala on April 25 at The Spa at Norwich Inn.

The mission of Bethsaida Community in Norwich is “to create a hope, a home, a family for homeless or at risk women.”  The vision is to create “additional supportive housing opportunities and related services,” and successful program graduates become employed and live independently.

For 17 years, Nancy has been in the nuclear industry, working in communications, human resources, and public affairs. Earlier, she’d been in banking for 16 years.

Bulkeley’s charge, she explains, “is basically to be out in the community representing Dominion.” Thus, much of her work focuses on the Dominion Foundation, which provides funds for local non-profits. She finds herself “meeting with them when they’re looking for funding, finding out what they’re looking for, and explaining our criteria.”

“We are thrilled to honor Nancy Bulkeley with the Bethsaida Community Impact Award,” says Claire Silva, Executive Director of Bethsaida Community, Inc.

“Nancy and the Dominion Foundation have supported Bethsaida’s programs for several years.  Nancy brings a personal element to her position.  She cares about the work being done by Bethsaida and other non-profits in the area.  She is committed to the ideal that clients have the best services and resources available, and that the community works collaboratively towards bridging gaps and creating solutions.”

Nancy has chaired the United Way of Southeastern Connecticut from 2011 to 2012, and is president of the Long Island Sound Foundation Board, a member of the Southeastern Connecticut Enterprise Region (seCTer) board, and a trustee for the Chamber of Commerce of Southeastern Connecticut. Additionally, she supports education programs and minority outreach programs.

The Pawcatuck resident believes in connecting business and education and she co-chairs the Chamber of Commerce Education Council Committee. She explains: “We’re getting businesses and schools together because it’s so important for students to know what businesses do and the opportunities there are.”

The committee promotes two programs, one of which is job shadowing “to get students out to businesses just to job shadow for a day and get the opportunity to see what folks do.”

The other is called, “Whose Job is it Anyway?” It’s a reference to the old game show, “What’s My Line?” She explains, “We have a panel of businesspeople and students, and the students ask the panel members what they do and they have to try figure out what they do for a career.”

“It’s just so important to get businesses and schools together, so schools understand businesses and businesses can understand how we can help the school system—it’s a two-way street,” she says.

Nancy says she is “so impressed with the programs Bethsaida has for women who are homeless, who are struggling.” She adds, “It made a real impression on me with how they help the women, and the staff is pretty awesome.”

“Non-profits in this area do so much for the community,” she adds. “Southeastern Connecticut is a great place to live. There’s a lot of dedicated, committed people in this area who volunteer and help out.”