Daily Archives: January 16, 2013

Accidents Happen to the Best of Us

Frederick Jaccarino, M.D.

Frederick Jaccarino, M.D.

As winter’s winds whirl and water turns to ice, the health care system braces for the seasonably predictable rash of weather-related traumatic injuries.  Snow, ice, and freezing temperatures lead inevitably to car crashes, falls, and thermal injuries.  Trauma care has evolved into a distinct field of medicine ever since pioneering doctors in the 1950’s and ’60’s started a system from the first responders to the definitive care centers.

Most of modern trauma care arose directly from wartime military experience, especially Vietnam and Korea.  There we learned that the first hour after a serious injury, the so-called Golden Hour, will determine the likelihood of survival.  So today the prehospital rescuers, not unlike field medics in combat, are expected to quickly carry out a list of actions and assessments which maximize the first part of the golden hour.  They are expected to evaluate the ABCDEs of resuscitation.  They will protect the spine from movement, they will stanch any active bleeding, and closely monitor the vital signs.  And importantly, they must triage correctly.

Triage is a way of matching resources to needs.  When managing an accident scene, the EMT must quickly go through the abc’s with each victim, initiate spinal immobilizations, and then determine if the injuries should be managed by the closest available site, the most appropriately qualified hospital, or the most convenient. The rapid, confident performance of the EMT, including triage decisions, results daily in hundreds of trauma victims getting the most appropriate treatment of their injuries. Though a nearby average ER may save a trauma victim’s life by being the quickest option, seriously traumatized persons  who can be safely delivered to a trauma center will be well served by the comprehensive care such centers represent.   For a hospital to be designated as a trauma center, it must meet the stringent requirements of the American College of Surgeons, including the requirement of having immediately available at all times doctors in anesthesia, neurosurgery, orthopedics, etc., and certain services such as CT scan and ultrasound.

So should a slip on the ice result in a slide followed by a snap and a crack, rest assured that your 911 call will result in a magical mystery tour of the trauma system.  Somehow the system works; from the EMT’s putting you in a splint and on a board, to the morphine for the pain, to the ER for x-rays, to the operating room for the orthopedist to pin the broken bone back together, to physical therapy and rehabilitation.

A Tale of Angels in Real Life

story & photo
by Jon Persson

(l-r) Sam Linder, New London Lions Club; Kelly Horton, Vice President, Gemma E. Moran United Way Labor/Food Center; Gemma Moran; and Tom Santos, New London Lions Club, celebrate major donation.

(l-r) Sam Linder, New London Lions Club; Kelly Horton, Vice President, Gemma E. Moran United Way Labor/Food Center; Gemma Moran; and Tom Santos, New London Lions Club, celebrate major donation.

“There is a band of angels in New London,” declares Gemma Moran, as members of the New London Lions Club unload a donation of $2600 worth of food at the center which bears her name.

The food, paid for with a grant from the International Lions Club, replaces supplies lost or depleted as a result of superstorm Sandy. Waterford’s ShopRite has helped stretch the donation dollars, contributing a discount on the usual pricing of the food. It is a continuation of a mission started years ago by the self-effacing Gemma, and which culminated in the Gemma E. Moran United Way/Labor Food Center in New London.

How much did the dollars stretch?

“Don’t mention me, mention the volunteers!” Gemma urges. “The most important thing is to thank everyone.” She rattles off the numbers for which the many volunteers and donors have been responsible in 2012: the 2,163,000 pounds of food delivered in 2,500 supply trips to 96 food pantries and soup kitchens across southeastern Connecticut.

Thanking the volunteers for their work is “the greatest respect and love I can give them,” says Gemma.

Indeed, the volunteer Lions and regular Center crew move with great energy and purpose, offloading the supplies from a box truck in pallet-loads, quickly moving perishables to the Center’s refrigerator-freezer. Greetings, resplendent with obvious affection, are offered throughout. During a brief pause, Sam Linder, president of the New London Lions, calls the gathering together with the admonition, “Gemma is going to tell a story.”

Then, as the audience listens with anticipation for some great wisdom or historic insight, Gemma proceeds to tell a joke from her days years ago in Boston. The twinkling eyes reveal a reason she has lived so well—into her 88th year.
It’s an active place. In the lounge area of the Center, volunteers from the Sprague Community Center and the New London Food Pantry wait for their turn to load their trucks with food supplies for the coming days. At the Sprague Center, some 200 people receive assistance on a regular basis; Outreach Coordinator Brenda Keefe says that “all are welcome” though they have a special emphasis on helping the working poor, who at times live outside of the public assistance system.

Gene Stringham of the New London Food Pantry says that they work on a voucher system to gain eligibility for Federal food assistance. “I’ll tell you how it began,” says Gemma, after the work is done.  “My job was to service the poor” in the union where she worked, when someone was in trouble they said, “Call Gemma!” One day a mother with two young daughters came to her office; Gemma asked what they needed, and one young daughter said, “Mommy’s got nothing in the refrigerator.”

“I decided something had to be done,” says Gemma. The United Way was offering Venture Grants, and Gemma was able to procure $5,000. The State gave her use of an old garage at Uncas-on-Thames hospital—and soon Gemma and her volunteers were supplying food to five local food pantries.

Today the Gemma E. Moran United Way/Labor Food Center is housed in a sizable warehouse located at 374 Broad Street near downtown New London.

The original five pantries are now 96 soup kitchens and pantries,  and donations are moved in and out by volunteers and a devoted staff. It is a calling heard from many quarters—professional, social, or spiritual—answering Gemma’s admonition, “You only get out of life what you put into it.”

There is a band of angels at work in the New London community; Gemma Moran is watching over them.

New Londoners Offer a Moving Remembrance for the Homeless

story & photo
by Jon Persson

Laura Edelstein, Volunteer Coordinator at the New London Homeless Hospitality Center, organized the Homeless Memorial on December 21st, in conjunction with National Homeless Memorial Day.

Laura Edelstein, Volunteer Coordinator at the New London Homeless Hospitality Center, organized the Homeless Memorial on December 21st, in conjunction with National Homeless Memorial Day.

The homeless of New London are safe from the sting of winter on the longest night of 2012, a fulfilled mission for the St. James and Covenant Shelters of this city that reaches into the new year. Yet on this chill night people gather at All Souls Church to remember 38 of the homeless who have passed, often too soon, from this life. It is a remembrance of the lives, and of the conditions of life, which contributed to their early passing. In the audience are homeless—and former homeless—as well as staff and volunteers from the shelters, the supporters and leaders, most of whom count friends among the deceased.

Two of these friends had died while in their tents, on the bitter nights of the 2006 winter. Their loss was the trigger for an increased effort in the city to seek out the unsheltered and offer them the security of a warm place to sleep. The group has found that there are many causes of homelessness, and thus many solutions are called for.

Susie Hermanson, a frequent presence at the Homeless Hospitality Center, leads the evening’s ceremonies, which are a mix of prayer and response, performances of songs by James Taylor and John Lennon, candles, and a moment of silence. Ron Steed offers a  reflection on the damaging effects of homelessness on health, and the illnesses made worse by lack of rest ad respite. Laura Edelstein, organizer of this memorial and of volunteers at the Hospitality Center, reads an appreciation of the many volunteers who make the center possible.

A darkened hallway, lit only by the light of electric candles, leads to the chapel where the memorial takes place.  Outside, along the Jay Street sidewalks, 38 winter hats adorn candy-cane stakes, each bearing the name of a New London homeless person who has passed since 2006.

Yet at the reading of the names of those who have passed, there is a fresh poignancy: a 39th name is added to the list—Brian Ash, 32 years old, a young man of gracious heart and noble spirit, lost his personal battle for life in the early morning hours of this very day, the shortest of 2012.

Brave Discoveries Herald Happiness

Bryan Golden

Bryan Golden
Author of “Dare to Live Without Limits”

Great discoveries are made, and breakthroughs take place, when directions are not followed or instructions are ignored.  This is because directions and instructions are based on what is understood at the time.  It’s impossible to give guidance on how to venture into the unknown.

This creates a dilemma since we all seek guidance in order to maximize our chances for success.  There is also a measurable level of comfort derived by staying within familiar boundaries.  It feels much safer to follow an existing path rather than blaze a new one.  This results in a fear of doing what has never been done before.

Your discoveries don’t have to change the course of history.  There is much room for personal discovery that impacts your quality of life and future.  These types of discoveries positively influence the course of your journey.

As we grow up, we are given many directions as to how we should live.  Much of the advice is worthwhile.  But we have to distinguish those suggestions that limit our discoveries.  You’ve probably heard some of the following: “Be realistic,” “Don’t rock the boat,” “Stop daydreaming,” “Find something secure,” “Limit your risks,” and “Don’t take chances.”  Let’s examine each one.

“Be realistic.”  Realistic is subjective.  What’s realistic for one person is restrictive for another.  Being “realistic” is usually used to discourage your aspirations.  Something is considered unrealistic only when it has not yet been attempted or it is not yet mainstream.

“Don’t rock the boat.”  Shaking things up gives you a new outlook.  Often a different perspective is required to uncover hidden opportunities.  You rock the boat when you move around and even hang over the side.  If you are not rocking the boat then you are just sitting there.  The result? Nothing will happen.

“Stop daydreaming.” Day- dreaming leads to aspirations.  It stimulates your imagination, creating a mental vision your mind will work on to make a reality.  Daydreaming has no limitations.  It gives you a sensation that anything is possible, which it is.

“Find something secure.”  Security is equated to a guarantee.  Nothing in life is guaranteed, especially when you depend on someone else to provide it.  The only person you can depend on is yourself.  You control your thoughts and actions.

“Limit your risks.”  Exactly how much should you limit them?  What are risks anyway?  Each person has their own understandings.  You take risks whenever you leave your home.  You don’t want to be reckless where risks far outweigh any benefits.  But risk is required to reach a desired destination.

“Don’t take chances.”  This statement associates chances with failure.  The implication is that by taking chances you have the chance of failure.  Failure is only something that didn’t work out as planned.  As long as you never give up, you never really fail.

There are limitless discoveries awaiting you.  Learn from those who have gone before you and then blaze you own path.  You have to write your own operations manual.  Ignore any discouraging instructions.  You will be venturing into unexplored territory so there won’t be any map.  Great happiness awaits those who are willing to make discoveries.

New Dime Bank ATM Dedicated

(l-r) Richard Virgin, General Manager of Fiddleheads; Nicholas Caplanson, President of Dime Bank; and Tony Sheridan of the Eastern Connecticut Chamber of Commerce, look on as Susan Zimmerman, President of Fiddleheads cuts the ribbon to dedicate a new ATM at the New London organic, fair trade grocery store.

(l-r) Richard Virgin, General Manager of Fiddleheads; Nicholas Caplanson, President of Dime Bank; and Tony Sheridan of the Eastern Connecticut Chamber of Commerce, look on as Susan Zimmerman, President of Fiddleheads cuts the ribbon to dedicate a new ATM at the New London organic, fair trade grocery store.

story & photo
by Jon Persson

Organic groceries now have a new friend at Fiddleheads in New London.  On December 1, Dime Bank officers dedicated a new ATM inside the organic, fair-trade grocery cooperative which for five years has anchored a movement to bring green economics to New London.

The new ATM merges two elements of society and economics; the traditional bank and the New Age, “locavore” grocery store.

Richard Virgin, General Manager at Fiddleheads, explains that this is an important measure of progress in the long-term mission of bringing healthy diets to an urban setting. It’s especially true when the store hosts such events as farmers’ markets, says Richard, where vendors might not be able to accept credit or debit cards.

Making healthy food choices available in urban centers, which some refer to as “food deserts,” is a vital part of improving the health of Americans in our cities. It is also still not a part of mainstream American life, says Richard. He cites a recent report by the Connecticut government identifying ten places to buy food in downtown New London—all were convenience stores, while Fiddleheads, the purveyor of local, organic, fresh, and fair trade foodstuffs, did not garner a mention.

But, Richard recounts, the new ATM is one more step in a process which brings Fiddleheads into the fast-moving present day. While the uniqueness of the store is a throwback to earlier, simpler, more “localized” times, Dime Bank’s ATM brings an element of mainstream technology to the evolving cooperative.

Putnam Bank Applauds St. Vincent de Paul Place

story & photo
by Maren Schober

On Dec. 6th Putnam Bank officials, staff and community leaders gathered at Putnam Bank in Norwich to pay tribute to the St. Vincent de Paul Place in Norwich as part of the 150th Anniversary Celebration of Putnam Bank. (l-r) Robert Halloran, Exe. Vice Pres./CFO, Putnam Bank, Thomas Borner, President /CEO, Putnam Bank, Ben Lathrop, Exe. Director, Norwich Chamber of Commerce, Jillian Corbin, Exe. Director, St. Vincent de Paul Place, Barbara Goloski, branch manager, Norwich Putnam Bank, Jonathan Demers, Head Teller, Norwich Putnam Bank.

On Dec. 6th Putnam Bank officials, staff and community leaders gathered at Putnam Bank in Norwich to pay tribute to the St. Vincent de Paul Place in Norwich as part of the 150th Anniversary Celebration of Putnam Bank. (l-r) Robert Halloran, Exe. Vice Pres./CFO, Putnam Bank, Thomas Borner, President /CEO, Putnam Bank, Ben Lathrop, Exe. Director, Norwich Chamber of Commerce, Jillian Corbin, Exe. Director, St. Vincent de Paul Place, Barbara Goloski, branch manager, Norwich Putnam Bank, Jonathan Demers, Head Teller, Norwich Putnam Bank.

As customers walk into the festively decorated lobby of the Putnam Bank in Norwich before the holidays, they wonder if they are in the right place and just what is going on!

The lobby is dressed out in seasonal cheer, and the bank is filled with Putnam professionals, town officials, community workers, and media. A table offers tasty breakfast pastries and warming beverages as part of the 150th Anniversary Celebration of Putnam Bank, bank officials, the community and the Norwich Chamber of Commerce members are on hand to pay tribute to the St. Vincent de Paul Place of Norwich.

Lynn Bourque, Putnam Bank’s Senior Vice President and Branch Administrator, explains. “In celebration of our 150th Anniversary, each week of the year an employee of Putnam bank chooses a nonprofit agency to support through local contributions. This week Putnam bank is applauding St. Vincent de Paul Place of Norwich, which was founded in 1979.  The staff and local community members are collecting non-perishable food staples over the month of November to donate to the kitchen. This event is sponsored by The Greater Norwich Area Chamber of Commerce.”

Putnam Bank was founded in 1862 and today has seven branch locations in addition to the main office in Putnam.
Two official presentations are made this December 6 morning.  One is by Ben Lathrop, Executive Director of the Greater Norwich Area Chamber of Commerce; he presents Thomas Borner, President and CEO of Putnam Bank, with a plaque commending Putnam Bank for its longevity, leadership, and commitment to people and businesses in the greater Norwich area.

Thomas then made a presentation of his own: three checks were awarded to Jillian Corbin, executive director of St. Vincent de Paul Place, along with the donations of collected canned goods for their food pantry. Jillian received more than she expected—a $1000 check that will pay for a clothes dryer for clients at St. Vincent de Paul Place;  $100 from the employees of Norwich Putnam Bank in lieu of exchanging gifts this year; and $750 that is a combination of $250 in celebration of December’s Open House event, plus a $500 donation from Thomas Borner and his wife, Kathy.
“I am overwhelmed!” exclaimed Jillian.  “Overwhelmed!”

Jillian relates, “We served over 82,000 hot meals this past year. Our Care and Advocacy programs include counseling, the use of laundry appliances and showers for our patrons.  We strive to motivate our clients to self-sufficiency and a better life.”

Eagle Home After Maintenance

The Coast Guard barque Eagle docked at Fort Trumbull after recent repairs.

The Coast Guard barque Eagle docked at Fort Trumbull after recent repairs. (Photo by Jon Persson)

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Eagle departed Naval Submarine Base New London and returned to her home mooring at Fort Trumbull in New London, Thursday, December 20.

Eagle arrived at the base September 26 and began a three-month dockside maintenance availability period.  The $3.4 million dollar project included a complete renewal of the 132-foot mizzen-mast, an overhaul of the main steering station, significant structural refurbishments, and major berthing area modifications.

At Fort Trumbull, the Eagle crew will finish the ship’s required annual maintenance period and begin preparing for the spring and summer training deployments.  As part of the preparations, Eagle will undergo the bi-annual Command Assessment of Readiness and Training and Tailored Ships Training Availability inspections to ensure the ship is safe and the crew is properly trained for all operations.

Eagle worked closely with the Coast Guard yard and the Naval Submarine Base in preparation for this dockside availability.  After being away from homeport for more than 265 days during fiscal year 2012, Eagle was able to remain in Southeastern Connecticut and complete all required maintenance.  Eagle has moored at SUBASE for hurricane avoidance and mitigation in the past, but this is the first time in more than 20 years that the ship has completed a major maintenance period at the submarine base.

“Without the much-appreciated assistance from our friends at Groton, Eagle would have needed to return to the Coast Guard Yard facility in Baltimore this winter in order to complete this necessary maintenance,” said Capt. Raymond Pulver, Eagle’s commanding officer, “The Navy welcomed us with open arms and truly made us feel at home during our time in Groton.  Their support was integral to being able to care for our crew and let them spend a little more time at home with their families before getting back underway for the 2013 training deployments.  We are genuinely grateful for their cooperation in making life on Eagle a little bit more comfortable for the crew this year.”

At 295 feet in length, the Eagle, known as “America’s Tall Ship,” is the largest tall ship flying the stars and stripes and the only active square-rigger in U.S. government service.  Constructed in 1936 by the Blohm and Voss Shipyard in Hamburg, Germany, and originally commissioned as the Horst Wessel by the German Navy, the Eagle was taken by the United States as a war reparation following World War II.

With more than 23,500 square feet of sail and six miles of rigging, the Eagle has served as a floating classroom to future Coast Guard officers since 1946, offering an at-sea leadership and professional development experience.  A permanent crew of six officers and 50 enlisted personnel maintain the ship and guide the trainees through an underway and in-port training schedule.

Ryan and Gladstone Lead Wireless Zone Stores to Success

by John Stratton

(l-r) Josh Carroll, sales associate, Wallingford location, Scott Gladstone, owner, Wireless Zone,  Matthew Schloemann, sales associate, Guilford location, Neil Ryan, owner, Wireless Zone, and James Stack, sales associate, New London location.

(l-r) Josh Carroll, sales associate, Wallingford location, Scott Gladstone, owner, Wireless Zone, Matthew Schloemann, sales associate, Guilford location, Neil Ryan, owner, Wireless Zone, and James Stack, sales associate, New London location.

We’ve all been living in the middle of a technological revolution for the past few decades, and for most of us that’s been a very good thing—except for the confusing onrush of new capabilities and “apps” for that powerful little cellphone that we carry. In fact, the phone is so powerful that we often can’t decide what, exactly, are the best choices for our own lives.
But there are those who are there to help us sort it all out.

For the two founders of Wireless Zone stores in eastern and southern ConnecticutNeil Ryan and Scott Gladstone—it’s definitely not a “one size fits all” business. For the past 20 years, they’ve built a reputation for both keeping abreast of technology for business-to-business service, as well as, providing up-front, face-to-face service to everyday cellphone users.  In fact, that service is what made them a success.

“Yes, the technology moves fast,” says Neil, “but Wireless Zone is there to make that technology available to real people to improve their real lives…by getting to know what those lives are all about.”

Scott adds that, “From Day One, we were very fortunate that we had a ‘customer-centric’ philosophy, building on referrals, involving ourselves in the community, and separating ourselves from our competitors.”

It was a lot of work, though, and involved a commitment to an opportunity that they jumped at in 1992, when Scott called Neil and said that they could collaborate in a then-emerging business. The two had been friends since freshman orientation at Keene State College in Keene, New Hampshire. Both were business majors; after graduation, Scott became involved in the car phone business… and he saw prospects for exciting growth. Neil plunged right in, and they both moved to southeastern Connecticut, with few contacts here other than a strong faith in the lifestyles of the communities around them—and in the Wireless Zone concept, which was part of the burgeoning Verizon system. They opened their first Wireless Zone in Groton, and now have ten stores with skilled, people-oriented personnel.

In those earliest days, Wireless Zone stores were about “car phones,” those gee-whiz features in the cars of traveling industrial representatives and busy business people whose office was effectively within their vehicle. Today, cell phones are everywhere, on every belt and in every handbag.

It’s hard to live without them, since they’ve grown far beyond voice communication into powerful computers with links to the Internet and hundreds of thousands of functions available. “It’s a remote control to the world,” Neil observes. As that “remote” increases in flexibility, though, understanding it becomes crucial.

“My view,” said Scott, “is that we are not a ‘box-store’ experience, selling a device and then charging you to set it up. We spend a lot of time to be sure that our team members know how to transfer data, emails, and applications for customers, so that the customer is confident in the phone’s use and potential.  And we are there at no charge if they have questions or are looking for suggestions.”

Neil cites a contractor who came in recently, wanting a new phone. “We were able to show him how a new application can scan a room and help to provide working drawings, measure studs, locate key structures. We do it all: set up, load, train, transfer data, handle everything in the transition. What’s cool is that we can save them money, too!”

Celebrating 20 Years of Wireless Zone Communications: On the 20th Anniversary guest list were Amara Alpert and Kitty Stalsburg, High Hopes Therapeutic Riding; Nancy and Bob Gentes, Madonna Place; Denise & Jeffrey Hawk, Hospice of Southeastern Connecticut; Bill Stanley and Karen Buck, L+M Hospital; Shawn Maynard, Thomas Birkenholz, and Kathy Gaito, Windham Hospital; Denise and Bob Hornbecker, Channel 3 Kids Camp; Make-a-Wish Foundation; Kathy and Lou Allen, Thames River Community Services; Jerry Fischer and Marcia Reinhard, Jewish Federation of Eastern Connecticut; and Lucy and Gerry Fortier, Brattleboro Area Drop In.

Celebrating 20 Years of Wireless Zone Communications: On the 20th Anniversary guest list were Amara Alpert and Kitty Stalsburg, High Hopes Therapeutic Riding; Nancy and Bob Gentes, Madonna Place; Denise & Jeffrey Hawk, Hospice of Southeastern Connecticut; Bill Stanley and Karen Buck, L+M Hospital; Shawn Maynard, Thomas Birkenholz, and Kathy Gaito, Windham Hospital; Denise and Bob Hornbecker, Channel 3 Kids Camp; Make-a-Wish Foundation; Kathy and Lou Allen, Thames River Community Services; Jerry Fischer and Marcia Reinhard, Jewish Federation of Eastern Connecticut; and Lucy and Gerry Fortier, Brattleboro Area Drop In.

“With our customers,” Neil adds, “it’s an interview process, to give them a better mobile experience and help them grow into its possibilities. We do tons of education; it’s free; it’s enjoyable; it comes to us naturally.”

They are continuing to seek expansion beyond their present stores in Groton, New London, Killingly, Branford, Guilford, Wallingford, North Windham, Putnam, Tolland…and Brattleboro, Vermont.  But a key is the staff, Scott asserts. “We keep our ears to the ground to find good people who are available,” he says, “so we can train, educate, and instill them with our customer-oriented values.”

The future of mobile computing and cellphones is ever-changing, said Neil, but he sees rapid increases in “machine-to-machine” connections that will keep homeowners in closer control of their home devices of all kinds; likewise, he sees ever more expansion of cellphones as means to manage home and personal finances.

Wireless Zone is very involved in community support with at least 50 organizations, notably the Make-a-Wish Foundation, Hospice of Southeastern Connecticut, Lawrence + Memorial Hospital, Waterford Country School, Madonna Place, and Thames Valley Community Services. The nonprofit donations can range from $1,000 to $30,000.

Neil, originally from Port Jefferson, Long Island lives in Stonington with his 10-year old son, Jack; and Scott is a Waterford resident with his wife, Simone, and children Shayna, 8, and Travis, 11.

“We’re fortunate, Scott reflects, “that the community was so receptive, and we want to always exceed people’s expectations for us.”

Resident Smart Power

Brian Valdini Participates in Siena College’s Theatre Production, “Anti Gone Today”

The Siena College Creative Arts Department and Stage III theatre club presented “Anti Gone Today,” a new spin on the Greek classic “Antigone”, in performances this November.

Brian Valdini served as a Scene Shop Student. Valdini, a resident of Colchester, is a Freshman Biology major at Siena.

Directed by Professor of Creative Arts Mahmood Karimi-Hakak, MFA, SED, the show infused today’s political landscape into the Sophocles tragedy. Tapes of speeches by President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney were integrated into the performance to add references that could be understood by today’s audience.

 

Area Residents Make the Dean’s List at RIT

The following local residents made the Dean’s List for Fall 2012 quarter at Rochester Institute of Technology:

Taylor Carpenter of Colchester, Conn., a third-year student in RIT’s B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences.
Andrew De Voe of Colchester, Conn., a third-year student in RIT’s B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences.
Jeremy Dominijanni of East Lyme, Conn., a third-year student in RIT’s B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences.
Cole Dubord of East Lyme, Conn., a third-year student in RIT’s College of Imaging Arts and Sciences.
Kyle Jackson of Stonington, Conn., a fourth-year student in RIT’s College of Imaging Arts and Sciences.
Andrew Kline of Gales Ferry, Conn., a first-year student in RIT’s Kate Gleason College of Engineering.
Maxwell Levesque of Colchester, Conn., a first-year student in RIT’s B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences.
Megan Minucci of Niantic, Conn., a first-year student in RIT’s College of Health Sciences and Technology.
Erin Moore of Voluntown, Conn., a first-year student in RIT’s College of Science.

 

Sarah Watson Selected as Gettysburg College David Wills Scholar

Sarah Watson of Essex, a current first-year student at Gettysburg College was awarded a David Wills Scholarship by the College. Gettysburg College recognizes students’ academic achievement in high school by awarding merit scholarships. The David Wills Scholarship goes to top-ranking applicants based upon their grade-point average, class rank, and SAT or ACT scores.

 

Local Students Earn High Honor Roll distinction for Fall 2012 at Pomfret School

The following area students were was recently named to the High Honor Roll for the fall term at Pomfret School.

Alicia Brisson of Colchester, a member of the Pomfret class of 2014, earned the distinction of High Honors with a 3.5 average and no grade below a B-.
Amanda Kewer of Oakdale, a member of the Pomfret class of 2015, earned the distinction of High Honors with a 3.5 average and no grade below a B-.
Breana Lohbusch of Lebanon, a member of the Pomfret class of 2016, earned the distinction of High Honors with a 3.5 average and no grade below a B-.

 

Daniel Perrotta Jr.  Graduates from York College of Pennsylvania

Daniel Perrotta Jr. of Groton, CT, graduated from York College of Pennsylvania on Dec. 19. Perrotta Jr. earned a BS degree in Biology.

 

Area students earn fall season athletic awards at Pomfret School

Pomfret School recently announced the recipients of the school’s deeded sports awards and other distinctions earned by varsity athletes for the fall sports season.

Lindsay Barber of Stonington, a member of the varsity field hockey team, made the NEPSAC All-tournament team. Lindsay is a member of the Pomfret class of 2013.
Amanda Kewer of Oakdale, a member of the varsity field hockey team, received the Coaches’ Award.. Amanda is a member of the Pomfret class of 2015.
Mark Kozlowski of Oakdale, a member of the varsity soccer team, made the NEPSAC soccer Junior Bowl.. Mark is a member of the Pomfret class of 2014.

 

 Sierra  Hollingsworth of Uncasville named to Harding University Dean’s List

Uncasville resident Sierra Hollingsworth, a sophomore at Harding University, is among more than 1,000 University students included on the dean’s list for grades achieved during the fall semester.

The dean’s list is published each semester by Dr. Larry Long, university provost, honoring those who have achieved high scholarship. To be eligible, a student must be carrying 12 or more hours with a 3.65 or higher grade-point average and no incompletes.

 

 Rebecca Holdridge, of Groton, Wins Campo Scholarship at Eastern Connecticut State University

Rebecca Holdridge ’13, a senior from Groton majoring in English at Eastern Connecticut State University, has been named the recipient of the University’s Constance Campo Scholarship. Holdridge was presented the award on Dec. 5 during the English Department’s “English Night.”

Holdridge maintains a GPA of 3.98 and is vice president of the Sigma Tau Delta, the national English honor society, and also serves as secretary of Eastern’s Omicron Delta Kappa, the national leadership honor society.

 

Berry College: Local Students Named to Dean’s List

The following local students have been named to the fall 2012 Dean’s List at Berry College:

Kristan Dziurzynski of North Stonington, CT
Missy Smith of Uncasville, CT

To be eligible for the Dean’s List, a student must carry a semester GPA of 3.5 or better.

 

Amanda M.  Woods Makes the President’s List at Coastal Carolina University

Amanda M. Woods, a Elementary Education major from Gales Ferry, CT, has made the President’s List at Coastal Carolina University for the Fall 2012 term.

To qualify for the President’s List, students must earn a 4.0 grade point average. All students must be enrolled full time.

 

Local Students Named to Dean’s List at University of Delaware

Several local students have been named to the University of Delaware’s Dean’s List for Fall 2012. Those students include:

Alexandra Buckingham, of East Lyme, Buckingham.
Emma Fontaine, of Norwich, Fontaine.
Taylor Gelinas, of Waterford, Gelinas.
Calvin Linderman, of Old Lyme, Linderman.
Elizabeth Luketich, of Mystic, Luketich.
Emily Mooradian, of East Lyme, Mooradian.
Rebecca Runkle, of Lebanon, Runkle.
Karie Simmons, of East Lyme, Simmons.
Stephen Uccello, of Amston, Uccello.
Courtney Vinchesi, of Old Lyme, Vinchesi.

To meet eligibility requirements for the Dean’s List, a student must be enrolled full-time and earn a GPA of 3.33 or above for the semester.

 

Local students honored for outstanding academic achievement at The Citadel

The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina, honored the following students with Gold Stars for academic excellence during the fall semester of the 2012-2013 academic year.

Gold Stars are awarded to students that achieve a 3.7 grade point average or higher. Gold Star recipients will be recognized during a military dress parade on Jan. 25.

Cameron Sean Pollard (a cadet), of Gales Ferry, CT. Major: Political Science . Home zip: 06335
Joshua James Tassone (a cadet), of Oakdale, CT. Major: Civil Engineering . Home zip: 06370

Gold Stars are worn on the collar of the cadet full dress and dress uniforms and the summer leave uniform.

 

SUNY Potsdam Student Ellen Lehet Earns Spot on College’s President’s List

Ellen Lehet of Waterford, CT, was recently named to the President’s List at The State University of New York at Potsdam. Lehet, whose major is Mathematics, was among nearly 900 SUNY Potsdam students who were honored for academic excellence.

President Dr. John F. Schwaller honored a total of 884 SUNY Potsdam students for earning the highest marks in the Fall 2012 semester.

To achieve the honor of being on the President’s List, each student must have satisfactorily completed 12 numerically-graded semester hours, with a grade point average of 3.5 or higher.

 

From the Publisher: January’s Bright Lights Dazzle

The Big 2-0 is Here! The Resident’s Alexis Ann celebrates Wireless Zone’s 20th anniversary with the company’s co-founders, Neil Ryan, left, and Scott Gladstone, right, at Mohegan Sun in December. Neil’s and Scott’s mobile-communications company has grown to ten stores since its founding in 1992 by the two college friends from Keene State--see page 19 for details.

The Big 2-0 is Here! The Resident’s Alexis Ann celebrates Wireless Zone’s 20th anniversary with the company’s co-founders, Neil Ryan, left, and Scott Gladstone, right, at Mohegan Sun in December. Neil’s and Scott’s mobile-communications company has grown to ten stores since its founding in 1992 by the two college friends from Keene State–see page 19 for details.

Sunrise in Noank,” a stunning photo by Steven Spellman, sets a tone of awakening…and brings to mind that Steven and I were classmates at Stonington High, just yesterday! Our good Senator who is now retiring, Joe Lieberman, received stellar recognition from the Department of Homeland Security. The Distinguished Service Medal is their highest honor and reflects his role in originating the department; so cast a watchful eye on page 5.

Our own tall ship, the Coast Guard’s Eagle, has a new lease on her 77-year life, courtesy of a three-month maintenance effort by the Submarine Base and the Coast Guard. The dockside work at the base is her longest maintenance period there in some 20 years. Sail on to page 5 see her berthed at Fort Trumbull.

Then, look ahead and see what’s cookin’ on page 8, as Celebrity Chef Robert Irvine of TV’s “Restaurant: Impossible” demonstrates his energy at the Garde. And don’t forget that he’ll be back soon to show us his skills at the Mohegan Sun’s WineFest 2013, coming up January 26 and 27 in the Uncas Ballroom. Get your tastebuds ready!

And while you’re looking forward, think of your special Valentine!  See our back cover for a chance to feature your Valentine tribute and photo on our February 13 front page. Maybe you’ll win a spectacular package of fun—a night at the Inn at Stonington, a gift from Fripperies, flowers from Garden of Eden, and dinner at Zack’s Bar & Grille in Stonington.  It will be a priceless memory that will last a lifetime!

Thanks for reading The Resident, the Good News that Rocks for 2013. Remember, The Resident reaches 64 communities and is the most cost-effective way to advertise in the region.

 

Alexis Anneditor & publisher

Alexis Ann
editor & publisher

Kensington’s at the Spa at Norwich Inn

Kensington’s at The Spa at Norwich Inn will offer a three-course gourmet dinner on Valentine’s Day for an all-inclusive price of $59 per person. Diners can turn dinner into an overnight escape by adding a Valentine package that includes a discounted guestroom and spa services.

The Feb. 14th menu, which features entrees of Apple Cider Brined Pork Rib Chop, Pan-Seared Delmonico Steak, Stuffed Chicken Rissole or Simply Grilled Swordfish, will be prepared by the Spa’s new Executive Chef, Edward Enseault of Westerly.

“I believe in a sophisticated level of simplicity,” said Esneault, who knew about farm-to-table cuisine before it had a name, having spent extended time as a boy at his grandparents’ farm in Louisiana. “And the foundation of all cooking is based on upholding the integrity of the ingredients, which should be of the highest quality.”

Appetizers include Baby Spinach and Marinated Mushroom Salad, Lobster Bisque, Sherry and Crabmeat Cocktail and Trofie Pasta with Smoked Chicken, Roasted Tomatoes and Escarole.

The romantic dessert menu features Bananas Foster For Two, prepared tableside; Chocolate Soufflé, Baked Alaska For Two and Ginger-Lavender Crème Brûlée.

A special overnight guestroom rate of $69, plus tax and resort fee, is available to those who order the Valentine’s Day Dinner Feb. 14 only; spa services will be available to these overnight guests at a 25 per cent discount Feb. 14 and 15.

The Spa at Norwich Inn and its restaurant, Kensington’s, are located at 607 W. Thames Street, Norwich.

For further information, visit www.thespaatnorwichinn.com.

860.425.3630

Maynard Readies to Tackle Big Issues in New Session

Senator Maynard joins colleagues in House and Senate in welcoming the start of the 2013 Legislative Session.

Senator Maynard joins colleagues in House and Senate in welcoming the start of the 2013 Legislative Session.

State Senator Andrew Maynard (D-Stonington) took part yesterday in the opening of the Connecticut General Assembly’s 2013 Legislative Session at the State Capitol.

He and his colleagues in the Senate were sworn in before joining members of the House for a Joint Session during which Governor Malloy gave his “State of the State” address. Senator Maynard praised the Governor’s emphasis on job creation and economic development.

“Every session we must make it our priority to protect small business and act as a catalyst for growth,” said Senator Maynard. “The initiatives we have undertaken in the last two legislative sessions have helped businesses create at least 35 jobs and retain more than 60 in the 18th Senatorial District alone. This is proof positive that state investment in small businesses can spark growth.”

The Governor began his speech by addressing the recent school shooting in Newtown, and Senator Maynard agreed that gun violence and mental health issues would be chief priorities for legislators in the new session.

“We were all sobered by the events which took place in Newtown, and I am committed to doing what is necessary to ensure that our communities are safer,” said Senator Maynard. “This is not a partisan issue, and I look forward to working across the aisle with both parties joining in this great effort.”

Overall, Senator Maynard said he had great hope for the next session. “We will be very busy this year. I am very much looking forward to addressing gun violence and mental health issues, helping to get Connecticut’s economy back on the right track, and working across the aisle to find common sense solutions to the problems we face. I am thrilled to be back and I am ready to work.”